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Does Jerusalem stone make good fertilizer?

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Last week, I wrote about the awesome, local, upcycled art available on most Second Saturdays at Jerusalem Stone, a local shop in the Waldo neighborhood where I live.

As I noted before, Jerusalem Stone doesn’t look like much from the outside. In fact, located on a dead-end street, it’s easy to miss. The shop specializes in beautiful dolomitic limestone imported from the Middle East for use in decoration and design projects for homes and businesses.

Currently, I’m not in the market for a slab of the ancient stone, but one of the shop owners informed me that the material known as Jerusalem stone serves another purpose: enriching soil.

Composed of calcium and magnesium, dolomitic limestone can be used as an organic supplement in soils lacking those minerals. In conversation with me, the shop owner credited the vitality of the peach and cherry trees planted at her store’s entrance to the Jerusalem stone in the surrounding soil. She said that she and her husband also use the stone in their home orchard and sell it to other local farmers.

Through some perfunctory research online, I discovered a lot of support for the helpful properties of carefully applied dolomitic lime in the garden, as well as some debate over its benefits. Considering we last spring we planted a mini orchard of our own, consisting of seven fruit and nut trees plus various berry bushes, I am very curious to learn more.

Fellow gardeners: Have you used dolomitic limestone to enrich your soil?

Awesome local, upcycled art

Are you ready for the holidays? I’m not.

I have accomplished very little shopping so far. Some of what I have gotten done occured within a tiny Waldo neighborhood shop that I recently visited for the first time.

Jerusalem Stone doesn’t look like much from the outside. In fact, located on a dead-end Waldo street, it’s easy to miss.

The shop specializes in beautiful, imported stone for use in decoration and design projects for homes and businesses. A few times a year, though, the shop turns into the site of a market for beautiful and unique handmade and vintage items.

Many of the artists incorporate found and recycled objects into their creations. When I was there last Saturday, I saw baby angels with real moth wings, jewelry made with reclaimed copper, gorgeous hand bags constructed of discarded upholstery and fabric scraps, and Boulevard beer caps dangling from earrings.

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The slideshow above includes some of the items I saw. I especially love the sturdy and reusable totes upcycled from old rice, kitty litter and dog food bags. Those are the creations of the Green Bag Ladies and also available on Etsy.

I bought a tote made from an Ol’ Roy dog food bag for Zach’s mother’s birthday last week, a bolt of handmade fabric from Jerusalem and four fragrant bars of handcrafted goat’s milk soap. She loved it all.

Typically, the market happens on the second Saturday of the month, but it stretched over three Saturdays in December for the holidays and now won’t resume again until March. You can learn more about the artists and market at the Second Saturdays at Jerusalem Stone page on Facebook.

Who is left on your holiday shopping list?

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