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Beer With Their Breakfast

It’s 5 o’clock somewhere, right?

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Yes, Luke. Yes, it is.

But it doesn’t matter, your beer is alcohol-free, and it doesn’t even require that nifty bottle opener you wear on your collar.

So, go ahead, guzzle some Bowser Beer. Lap it up at the beginning of a hard day. Use it like gravy, even, on your kibble.

The other guys are doing it, too.

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I’ve known about the dog-friendly Bowser Beer for a while, but I had not run into any locally until last weekend’s Dogs on the Lawn event at the Nelson-Atkins Museum.

For just a few dollars, I grabbed a bottle of the Beefy Brown Ale for my boys to try.

According to the label, the suggested serving size is one bottle for medium to large dogs and half a bottle for small dogs. However, even the proprietors of the food truck for dogs where I bought it said they don’t give their two labs that much beer.

They suggested a splash here and there, maybe drizzled over some kibble. Just refrigerate after opening, they advised.

I broke out the bottle the very next day. Before pouring some in a dish for the dogs, I tasted it myself.

I found it watery and slightly sweet, not so beefy.

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Scooby tried it next. Although puzzled at first, he soon lapped it up eagerly.

Luke then had pretty much the same reaction.

Finally, Charlie “Chetty” Machete got his portion. He was least impressed of all, licking at the bowl and then looking up at me, as if to say, “Where’s the beef?”

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The next morning, I poured a little Bowser Beer over everyone’s dry food. That did seem to make mealtime significantly more exciting.

Although I don’t see us buying Bowser Beer by the case, I think it’s a brilliant item for a dog-oriented food truck to stock. I’m sure Good Dog 2 Go will do great business  at pet-friendly races and other summer events.

Besides the novelty, one reason someone may want to give their dogs Bowser Beer is for the glucosamine.

Bowser Beer

Glucosamine HCL is the fourth ingredient on the label, after water, beef and malt extract. The only other three ingredients are common preservatives: citric acid, sodium benzoate and potassium sorbate.

I could also see how incorporating Bowser Beer into a dog’s diet – regularly or as an infrequent treat – could help boost a dog’s water intake or help make liquid medicine go down a little easier.

Bowser Beer is made in the U.S.A. with all domestically-sourced products. You can learn more at BowserBeer.com.

Would you let your dogs try Bowser Beer?

I have no affiliation with Bowser Beer. I simply bought some and wanted to share my experience!

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